NZNO's Blog

Our brave and resilient nurses

3 Comments

Anzac daySaturday 25 April is Anzac day and this year is the centenary of New Zealand’s participation in the First World War. Here at NZNO we’re remembering all those affected by war, whether at home or abroad and especially our nursing sisters who didn’t think twice about stepping up to do what had to be done.

We couldn’t be more proud of each and every one of them. Their stories deserve to be told.

If you are interested in finding out a bit more about our herstory of nursing in wartime, check out the links below. There’s everything from a moving speech about women’s contribution in war, by a young Papanui high school student to information about the hospital ships our nurses worked on. We hope you enjoy the selection.

from http://www.nzans.org/NZANS%20History/NZANSHistory-1915-1922.html

Wounded ready for loading onto a hospital ship, Gallipoli.

http://www.nzans.org/

A website established to recognise the nurses of our military force, past and present.

http://www.nzhistory.net.nz/war/first-world-war-hospital-ships

The Maheno and Marama were the poster ships of New Zealand’s First World War effort. Until 1915 these steamers had carried passengers across the Tasman for the Union Steam Ship Company, but as casualties mounted at Gallipoli, the government pressed them into service as hospital ships.

http://www.nzhistory.net.nz/media/interactive/nurses-hospital-and-health

Tending to the wounded on or near the battlefield was a huge job, and it was done under the most difficult conditions. New Zealand’s medical services were well organised and included surgeons, anaesthetists, nurses and a fully equipped dental hospital.

Papanui High School student Katie Mills presenting her speech as a finalist in the 2015 ANZ RSA Cyril Bassett VC Speech Competition.

http://www.nzhistory.net.nz/page/troopship-marquette-sunk-killing-32-nz-medical-staff

from http://www.nzhistory.net.nz/media/photo/hospital-ship-marquette

A memorial postcard showing the troop transport Marquette with a list of the 32 members of the New Zealand Medical Corps, New Zealand Army Nursing Service and NZEF lost in the sinking on 23 October 1915

The sinking of the transport ship Marquette in the Aegean Sea in late 1915 added to the grief of a nation still reeling from the heavy losses at Gallipoli. Among the fatalities were 32 New Zealanders, including 10 nurses – making 23 October the deadliest day in the history of this country’s military nursing.

http://www.3news.co.nz/nznews/lottie-gallais-nurse-on-wwi-hospital-ship-maheno-2015041916#axzz3Y4yzNQ4Z

TV3 takes a look at what happened through the eyes of a war nurse, Lottie Gallais.

http://www.3news.co.nz/nznews/great-war-stories-health-educator-ettie-rout-2015042118#axzz3XveQctXz

Ettie Rout was a pioneering health educator who promoted safe sex for soldiers.

http://www.nzhistory.net.nz/media/photo/new-zealand-nurses-and-medical-officers

In July 1915, during the Gallipoli campaign of the First World War, Ettie Rout set up the New Zealand Volunteer Sisterhood and invited women between the ages of 30 and 50 to go to Egypt to care for New Zealand soldiers. In spite of government opposition, she sent the first batch of 12 volunteers to Cairo that October.

In July 1915, during the Gallipoli campaign of the First World War, Ettie Rout set up the New Zealand Volunteer Sisterhood and invited women between the ages of 30 and 50 to go to Egypt to care for New Zealand soldiers. In spite of government opposition, she sent the first batch of 12 volunteers to Cairo that October.

New Zealand Army nurses and medical officers pose in front of the carved gateway of the New Zealand Stationary Hospital at Wisques, France.

http://www.nzhistory.net.nz/media/photo/eg-brooke

Evelyn Brooke (1879-1962) was matron on the hospital ship Maheno, which left New Zealand for Gallipoli in July 1915.

http://ww100.govt.nz/ and www.facebook.com/WW100NZ

The official 100th Gallipoli website and facebook. There are some wonderful nursing photos on the facebook page.

Articles from this month’s Kai Tiaki Nursing New Zealand

Army nursing service goes to war

Editorial

Honouring the Marquette nurses

Making some sense of war

Marking 100 years

Nursing our boys during the Gerat War

 

 

 

Photo: Alexander Turnbull Library

Nurses look out of the windows of the NZ Stationary Hospital, Wisques, France, during World War 1

 

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WWI Remembered: A Light & Sound Show – Wellington Remembers. A light and sound show featuring art and historical imagery projected onto buildings at Pukeahu

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WWI Remembered: A Light & Sound Show – Wellington Remembers. A light and sound show featuring art and historical imagery projected onto buildings at Pukeahu

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WWI Remembered: A Light & Sound Show – Wellington Remembers. A light and sound show featuring art and historical imagery projected onto buildings at Pukeahu

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Matron-in-chief Hester Maclean

Photo: Royal NZ Returned and Services' Association

A New Zealand Nurse and orderly outside the diphtheria ward, NZ Stationary Hospital, Wisques, France, 1918

 

 

3 thoughts on “Our brave and resilient nurses

  1. It has been a real history lesson for me to learn about the involvement nurses had in the war 100 years ago. I was surprised also to learn about how many lost their lives as part of this. It has brought the country together in a way that I haven’t seen for a while. Let us remember this weekend all those who lost their lives in fighting for our country . The light and sound show in Wellington is amazing

  2. Do look out for and read the April issue of Kai Tiaki Nursing New Zealand. Our special Nurses at War issue includes five historical feature articles about nurses’ involvement in and responses to the war, as well as an editorial by nursing researcher Clare Ashton. This is an issue to keep! Anne Manchester, Kai Tiaki Nursing New Zealand co-editor

  3. I wore my RN medal when I attended a small ANZAC service in North Canterbury. I was approached by many people, both nurses and the general public, keen to comment on the contribution of nurses during times of conflict. So proud.

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